Rosemary Sutcliff’s novel about Alkibiades | The Flowers of Adonis

In the introduction to her historical novel  The Flowers of Adonis, Rosemary Sutcliff wrote:

I have provided a possible explanation for Antiochus’s insane foolhardiness when left in command of the Athenian Fleet, because Thucidides’s bald account is so unbelievable (unless one assumes that both Antiochus and Alkibiades were mentally defective) that any explanation seems more likely than none.
Alkibiades himself is an enigma. Even allowing that no man is all black and all white, few men can ever have been more wildly and magnificently piebald. Like another strange and contradictory character Sir Walter Raleigh, he casts a glamour that comes clean down the centuries, a dazzle of personal magnetism that makes it hard to see the man behind it. I have tried to see. I have tried to fit the pieces into a coherent whole; I don’t know whether I have been successful or not; but I do not think that I have anywhere falsified the portrait.

The Flowers of Adonis by Rosemary Sutcliff; book cover

Newspaper review of The Flower of Adonis by historical fiction writer Rosemary Sutcliff about enigmatic Ancient Greece hero Alkibiades

Poor research: I clipped this from a newspaper in 2010, but I did not note which one!

(But see comments below for more details)

Review of The Flower of Adonis | Historical novel for adults by Rosemary Sutcliff | The Times

Rosemary Sutcliff‘s The Flower of Adonis reviewed in The Times of London in 1969 (before it was behind an electronic paywall!).Read More »

Rosemary Sutcliff’s Fabulous Flower of Adonis

Emma-in-Oz wrote in her blog in 2008 that the Flower of Adonis was ‘fabulous’:

It’s one of her ‘adult’ novels. It has a difficult and fairly dark subject matter – the end of the Greek golden age of the fifth century. Read More »

Interesting views & titles already from collecting on Twitter and Website views about eminent writer of children’s literature and historical fiction Rosemary Sutcliff‘s best books of fiction & re-telling

Rosemary Sutcliff’s Best Books

So far almost twenty of Rosemary Sutcliff’s books of children and young adults fiction and historical fiction have been cited either here or on Twitter (#BestRosemarySutcliffBook) after my call for choices and rationales. Some people snuck in more than one choice.

Of those, some raised possible distinctions between reading and re-reading, reading as a child and as an adult, reading novels written for adults and those written for children, and those books of fiction versus her re-telling of saga and legend

A Little Dog Like You (first published 1987)
Blood Feud (1976)
Brother Dusty Feet (1952)
Dawn Wind (1961)
Frontier Wolf (1980)
Simon (1953)
Song for a Dark Queen (1978)
Sword at Sunset (1963)
The Armourer’s House (1951)
The Eagle of the Ninth (1954)
The Flowers of Adonis (1969)
The High Deeds of Finn MacCool (1967)
The Hound of Ulster (1963)
The Lantern Bearers (1959)
The Mark of the Horse Lord (1965)
The Shining Company (1990)
The Silver Branch (1957)
The Witch’s Brat (1970)
Warrior Scarlet (1957)