Rosemary Sutcliff Facebook-likers vigorously criticise Booktrust so-called ‘Best 100 children’s books of last 100 years’ | No Rosemary Sutcliff on it!

Over at the Facebook page for Rosemary Sutcliff  readers have been robust about  the error of The Booktrust’s ways in excluding Rosemary Sutcliff from their attempt to list the 100 best children’s books of the last 100 years. I asked for help in compiling a broadside.

I’m not sure this will help, but the books I enjoyed when I was 11 still engage me at 63! I’ve never felt that Rosemary Sutcliff writes for children alone. There’s probably no more poignant tale than The Lantern Bearers. Also, she has a talent for dialogue in an historical context which is unsurpassed. Most children’s authors have nothing remotely like it. (Roy Marshall)

Rosemary Sutcliff’s books last in the mind and heart. I am 63 now and they stand out as Beacons from my childhood. I have reread many in mid and later life and they are even better. I am with Roy, The Lantern Bearers is my favourite – so evocative and of our own end times too. (Rob Patterson)

Rosemary Sutcliff’s Roman books, starting with the Eagle of the Ninth (but I read all the others – The Mark of the Horse Lord was probably the one that really inspired me), were one of the influences that led me to study archaeology.

Continue reading “Rosemary Sutcliff Facebook-likers vigorously criticise Booktrust so-called ‘Best 100 children’s books of last 100 years’ | No Rosemary Sutcliff on it!”

Rosemary Sutcliff, The Eagle of the Ninth and the North-East of England

Rosemary Sutcliff’s finest fiction The Eagle of the Ninth and other books related to North East England

The Eagle of the Ninth (now a 2010 film) is ‘perhaps’ Rosemary Sutcliff’s ‘finest book of historical fiction’ claims Alan Myers, and she is ‘one of the most distinguished children’s writers of our times’. The Eagle of the Ninth ‘exemplifies the psychological dilemmas that Rosemary Sutcliff brought to her novels’.

Continue reading “Rosemary Sutcliff, The Eagle of the Ninth and the North-East of England”

Rosemary Sutcliff children’s book The Capricorn Bracelet combines short stories

As a long article about elsewhere has alluded to, Rosemary Sutcliff book The Capricorn Bracelet used the technique, also used by Rudyard Kipling, of inter-connected short stories. The stories are connected by a family heirloom passed down through successive generations of a Roman military family serving in northern Britain at Hadrian’s wall: the bracelet of the title is for distinguished conduct awarded by the Second Legion, known as the II Augusta, and inscribed with the legion’s capricorn emblem. Continue reading “Rosemary Sutcliff children’s book The Capricorn Bracelet combines short stories”